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IS HETERODOXY THE ESSENCE OF JESUIT EDUCATION?

January 29, 2010

IT WOULD BE EASY TO DISMISS THE OPINION OF COACH MAJERUS AS JUST THE OPINION OF ONE MAN.

However, the frequent stories in the media of the presidents and faculty members of such famous Jesuit universities as Georgetown, Fordham, Loyola, etc. of words and actions which indicate a contempt for the magisterial teaching of the Church prompt me to think that maybe Coach Majerus is onto something.

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Majerus addresses controversial topics again
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
01/29/2010
Rick Majerus’ interview with WGN radio in Chicago on Monday, which has caused much intrigue in St. Louis because he abandoned his own local show, covered much more than just basketball as he delved into politics and didn’t back down from a highly controversial stand that caused a furor two years ago.

He was extremely forthright, gracious and thoughtful in his comments to David Kaplan in a segment of the interview that range from Haiti to the Vietnam War to politicians. And he reiterated his stance on two highly controversial topics — abortion and stem-cell research — that got him into trouble two years ago with the local Catholic hierarchy, given that he works for a Jesuit school and its teachings are contrary to Majerus’ views.

“The bishop was going to excommunicate me” two years ago, Majerus said on the show and reaffirmed his positions.

“I believe in that,” Majerus said Monday of the stem-cell issue. “What you need is hope. All religion — I don’t care what religion you are — is based on the premise of hope and contrition.”

He also said his view on abortion is unchanged, that it should be an individual choice.

“Nobody is for abortion” he said. “But I’m for a women’s choice, I am pro choice.”

He added that six of his uncles fought in World War II and said his dad was in Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous civil-rights march in Selma, Ala. Majerus said their actions paved the way for him to be able to “do whatever I wanted in America and be whoever I wanted to be and advocate for it.”

He concluded the political portion of the conversation by underscoring that he believes it’s important for people to not only take a stance but to stand up for that position.

“It’s a great world out there and you should participate in it,” he said. “That’s what the essence of Jesuit education is.”

http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/sports/stories.nsf/slu/story/CBF26EF6D155B05D862576BA001F367A?OpenDocument

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