THE LONG TERM SOLUTION – CONTINUING CATHOLIC EDUCATION – BOILS DOWN TO TRADITIONAL CATECHESIS

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Sunday, January 22, 2017

The 900-Pound Gorilla: Marginally Catechized Cafeteria Catholics

 by  John J. Aréchiga

 

John J. Arechiga is known to me to be a researcher of exceptional ability.
For some time I have read the results of his research and at my urging 
he has agreed to allow me to publish several of his essays.  This essay 
addresses a matter of critical importance to the Roman Catholic Church at this moment in its history.  I publish this essay in the hope that it will contribute to the efforts of persons in the Church in authority who have the power to find solutions to the problems that currently afflict the Church.
 
+Rene Henry Gracida, Bishop Emeritus of Corpus Christi
Sister Leo with her catechism students in Las Vegas in 1963. The sisters’ job  in those days was to conduct catechism classes for kids who attended public school.  This was long before the “Church as field hospital” era, of course, when the Church still had no concept of mercy.


“For there shall be a time when they will not endure sound doctrine but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned into fables.” 
[Holy Bible, Douay-Rheims translation, New Testament, 2 Timothy 4:3-4]

Sheep find comfort in the incessant noise of empty rhetoric. You have to wonder whether this moment in history, this moment in time, is a product of marginally catechized cafeteria Catholics.

Arguably, most – if not all – marginally catechized cafeteria Catholics are marginally catechized through no fault of their own.

Arguably, the root cause is the USCCB’s Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series that essentially offers the modernist catechist with a cafeteria style menu of texts to choose from – but more about that later. Back to basics.

Catholic modernism and political correctness masked the movement away from traditional catechism based education – and thus began the evolution of marginally catechized modernist cafeteria Catholics.

If you are still scratching your head, and wondering what Catholic modernism is about, it is probably because you have never read Pascendi Dominici Gregis or A Catechism on Modernism. Both were published in 1907 – long before the Second Vatican Council.

Pascendi Dominici Gregis, On the Doctrines of the Modernists, is an Encyclical published by Pope Saint Pius X, on September 8, 1907.

A Catechism on Modernism, a little known follow-on to Pascendi Dominici Gregis, was also published in 1907. This catechism has a peculiar structure. It is written as an imaginary interview of Pope Saint Pius X by the author (Rev. J. B. Lemius).   In the imaginary interview Pope Saint Pius X dissects meticulously and magisterially, as only he knew, the modernist heresy in all its branches.  In its time A Catechism on Modernismwas highly praised by Pope Saint Pius X.

Today A Catechism on Modernismis an essential tool for all Catholics to understand how far the modernist heresy penetrated inside the Church – especially since the Second Vatican Council.

It can be argued that the modernist movement away from catechism-based education is another reason that the flame of righteousness that once roared from our pulpits has been reduced to a flicker….

Do we have a reference point from which traditional catechesis began its movement away from catechism-based education? Yes. During the early history of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States all of the dioceses were part of one ecclesiastical province under the Archbishop of Baltimore:

A Catechism of Christian Doctrine, Prepared and Enjoined by Order of the Third Council of Baltimore, or simply the Baltimore Catechism, is the official national catechism for children in the United States of America. The first such catechism written for Catholics in North America, it was the standard Catholic school text in the country from 1885 to the late 1960s.”

“In response to a personal copyright taken out by Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, various editions include annotations or other modifications. While the approved text had to remain the same in the catechisms, by adding maps, glossaries or definitions publishers could copyright and sell their own version of the catechism. The Baltimore Catechism remained in use in nearly all Catholic schools until many moved away from catechism-based education, though it is still used in some.” [Essentially Verbatim: WikipediaBaltimore Catechism, as of 23 December 2016]

The Baltimore Catechism remained in use in nearly all Catholic schools until the 1960’s (post Second Vatican Council) when many schools and diocese quietly started moving away from catechism-based education – as evidenced by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishop’s (USCCB’s) most recent Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series.

The USCCB’s January 9, 2017, Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series is essentially an online five page digital list of “texts and series [that] have been found to be in conformity with the Catechism of the Catholic Church by the Subcommittee on the Catechism, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.”

The USCCB’s 2017 Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series essentially offers the modernist catechist with a cafeteria style menu of texts to choose from.

The USCCB’s 2017 Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series is arranged by target audience: Pre-School Series, Elementary Series (School and Parish), High School Texts, High School Doctrinal Framework Texts, High School Series, Sacramental Preparation Materials, Materials in Other Languages, Supplemental Materials, and Materials for RCIA.  

It should be pointed out that the USCCB’s five page Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series, with one exception (A Catholic Catechism in English and Polish), does not list or otherwise include a complete or actual Catholic catechism (e.g., Catechism of the Catholic ChurchBaltimore Catechism, etc.).

This requires disambiguation because the USCCB’s Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series includes:

1.             The Apostolate’s Family Catechism
2.             Understanding the Catechism: Creed 
3.             Understanding the Catechism: Liturgy and Sacraments 
4.             Understanding the Catechism: Morality 
5.             Understanding the Catechism: Prayer 
6.             Little Catechism on the Eucharist

The book titles are misleading. The book titles infer they are a Catholic catechism – when in fact they are a textbook.

It should also be pointed out that the USCCB’s five page Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series does not list or otherwise include any concise Catechism’s that focus on relevant issues. For example:

1.             A Catechism of Modernism by The Reverend J. B. Lemius, O.M.I.,
2.             Catechism on The Real Presence by Father John A. Hardon, S.J.,
3.             Catechism on the Splendor of Truth by Father John A. Hardon, S.J.
4.             Catechism on the Gospel of Life by Father John A. Hardon, S.J.
5.             Catechism on Humana Vitae by Monsignor Charles M. Mangan
6.             Catechism on HomosexualityIncludes texts of Declaration on Certain Questions Concerning Sexual Ethics and On the Pastoral Care of Homosexual Persons, by Father John A. Hardon, S.J.
7.             Catechism on the Lay Apostolate by Father John A. Hardon, S.J.
8.             Catholic Catechism on Consecrated Life by Father John A. Hardon, S.J.
9.             Catholic Catechism on the Angels by Father John A. Hardon, S.J.
10.          Catechism on Redemptoris CustosOn the Person and Mission of Saint Joseph in the Life of Christ and of the Church, by Father Charles M. Mangan
11.          Catechism on the Apostolic Constitution Ineffabilis Deus Concerning the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary by Monsignor Charles M. Mangan
12.          The Catechism on Chapter Eight of Lumen Gentium by Monsignor Charles M. Mangan

Individually, these last twelve catechisms include the imprimatur of either Bishop Emeritus René H. Gracida (Diocese of Corpus Christi, Texas), Cardinal Raymond L. Burke (Bishop Emeritus of the Diocese of La Crosse, Wisconsin), Bishop Emeritus Thomas G. Doran (Diocese of Rockford, Illinois), Bishop Paul J. Swain (Diocese of Sioux Falls, South Dakota), Bishop Robert F. Vasa (Bishop Emeritus of the Diocese of Baker, Oregon), Archbishop Robert J. Carlson (Bishop Emeritus of the Diocese of Sioux Falls, South Dakota), or Bishop Emeritus Fabian W. Bruskewitz (Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska). By virtue of their imprimatur, it cannot be argued that any of these catechisms do not conform to the Catechism of the Catholic Church. This begs the question of why they are not on the “Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series.”

This also begs the question of when, if ever, students learn there is an actual Baltimore Catechism or Catechism of the Catholic Church – in print or online. This also begs the question of whether the USCCB needs approval of their Conformity Listing of Catechetical Texts and Series pursuant to Apostolos Suos. Finally, it begs the question of whether the USCCB’s “conformity” is consistent with the rigors of Nihil Obstat and Imprimatur.

For the moment the issue is not whether the USCCB’s listed Catechetical Texts and Series are faithful to the magisterium. For the moment the issue is whether the listed Catechetical Texts and Series adequately replace traditional catechesis. The issue becomes mixing and matching the right texts and series to cover the range of doctrine in traditional catechisms – and the qualifications of the people at the local level that do the mixing and matching.

Arguably, the move away from catechism-based education has resulted in marginally catechized modernist cafeteria Catholics – who arguably may not have been taught the full spectrum of Catholic doctrine found in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Arguably, the move away from catechism-based education has also resulted in marginally catechized modernist Catholics teaching catechism in our grammar, middle, and high schools; and in our colleges, and universities; and in our Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) and Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) programs.

Arguably, it is these marginally catechized Catholics that have given rise to modernist cafeteria Catholics that believe abortion is a woman’s choice, that homosexuals have the right to marry, that divorced and remarried Catholics may receive communion, etc.

We need to address the issue of marginally catechized Catholics. The question is how. It will be a daunting challenge to reintroduce traditional catechesis given the United States Conference of Catholic Bishop’s support for the movement away from catechism-based education.

It can even be argued that the movement away from catechism-based education is one of several reasons that the flame of righteousness that once roared from our pulpits has been reduced to a flicker….

An interim solution is for all Catholics to read Baltimore Catechism Four from cover to cover. Why? Baltimore Catechism Four is also known as An Explanation of the Baltimore Catechism. It was written as a reference work and teachers manual for the original Baltimore Catechism. Its purpose is to provide easy reference, questions bear the same numbers as Baltimore Catechisms One and Two. Its purpose is to explain the questions in greater detail.

Baltimore Catechism One is a simple edition intended for first through fourth graders. Baltimore Catechism Two is recommended for those in grades six through nine – or for Confirmation classes. [Essentially Verbatim: Baltimore Catechism Four, outside back cover]

Baltimore Catechisms One and Two comprise the essential teachings of our traditional Roman Catholic faith.

Reading Baltimore Catechism Four from cover to cover will reinforce the faith of traditionally catechized Roman Catholics. More importantly, Baltimore Catechism Four will provide marginally catechized Roman Catholics with an essential foundation for further catechesis.

The long term solution – Continuing Catholic Education – boils down to traditional catechesis and the catechisms of choice. More about that later…

 

About abyssum

I am a retired Roman Catholic Bishop, Bishop Emeritus of Corpus Christi, Texas
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