EVANGELIZING THE GORILLA: TRADITIONAL CONTINUING CATHOLIC EDUCATION

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Evangelizing the Gorilla: Traditional Continuing Catholic Education

“For there shall be a time when they will not endure sound doctrine but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned into fables.” [Holy Bible, Douay-Rheims translation, New Testament, 2 Timothy 4:3-4]

By John J. Aréchiga 26 March 2017

 

John J. Aréchiga is known to me to be a researcher of exceptional ability. For some time I have read the results of his research and at my urging he has agreed to allow me to publish several of his essays. This essay addresses a matter of critical importance to the Roman Catholic Church at this moment in its history. I publish this essay in the hope that it will contribute to the efforts of persons in the Church in authority who have the power to find solutions to the problems that currently afflict the Church.

+Rene Henry Gracida, Bishop Emeritus of Corpus Christi

 

 

Text and tweet no more – read, and read, and read some more.

If marginally catechized modernist cafeteria Catholics are a 900-Pound Gorilla, then we must evangelize the gorilla. It is called Traditional Continuing Catholic Education.

Hopefully you have opted for the interim solution – reading the Baltimore Catechism Four. Hopefully you will read it from cover to cover before opting for a more formal objective oriented catechesis course of instruction. If so, you are on the Traditional Continuing Catholic Education fast track.

 

Traditional Continuing Catholic Education presumes you are, as a minimum, a marginally catechized confirmed Roman Catholic; that you have received the Sacrament of the Apostolate (i.e., the sacrament of Confirmation).

That being said, Traditional Continuing Catholic Education is a long-term solution designed to fraternally correct (Matthew 18:15-18) marginally catechized modernist cafeteria Catholics and to help traditionally catechized Roman Catholics grow in their faith – and defend it.

Traditional Continuing Catholic Education needs to be implemented posthaste. Why? It is a time consuming process and there is an urgent need to bring marginally catechized modernist cafeteria Catholics back to the fullness of their Catholic faith – so they can in turn catechize the younger generation. Traditionally catechized Roman Catholics will also benefit from a program of Traditional Continuing Catholic Education.

That being said, understand that Fidei Depositum is a modernist 1992 Apostolic Constitution “on the Publication of the Catechism of the Catholic Church prepared following the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council.” Fidei Depositum, in the last paragraph of its introduction, states:

“Following the renewal of the Liturgy and the new codification of the canon law of the Latin Church and that of the Oriental Catholic Churches, this catechism will make a very important contribution to that work of renewing the whole life of the Church, as desired and begun by the Second Vatican Council.” [1994 Catechism of the Catholic Church, page 3]

Arguably, the 1994 Catechism of the Catholic Church is a modernist catechism. Will future historians refer to the 1992/1994 Catechism of the Catholic Church as the modernist Catechism of the Second Vatican Council? Proceed carefully with the selection of your catechism of choice…

It can also be argued that the 1983 Johanno-Pauline Code of Canon Law is a modernist code of canon law. In promulgating the 1983 Code of Canon Law (1983 CIC) Pope John Paul II wrote in pertinent part:

“From this there are derived certain fundamental criteria which should govern the entire new Code, both in the sphere of its specific matter and also in the language connected with it. It could indeed be said that from this there is derived that note of complementarity which the Code [1983 CIC] presents in relation to the teaching of the Second Vatican Council, in particular with reference to the two constitutions, the dogmatic constitution Lumen gentium and the pastoral constitution Gaudium et spes.” [1983 Johanno-Pauline Code of Canon Law, page xxx]

“Hence it follows that what constitutes the substantial newness of the Second Vatican Council, in line with the legislative tradition of the Church, especially in regard to ecclesiology, constitutes likewise the newness of the new Code.” [1983 Johanno-Pauline Code of Canon Law, page xxx]

“If, therefore, the Second Vatican Council has drawn from the treasury of Tradition elements both old and new, and the new consists precisely in the elements which we have enumerated, then it is clear that the Code also should reflect the same note of fidelity in newness and of newness in fidelity, and conform itself to that in its own field and in its particular way of expressing itself.” [1983 Johanno-Pauline Code of Canon Law, page xxxi]

Will future historians refer to the 1983 Johanno-Pauline Code of Canon Law as the modernist Canon Law of the Second Vatican Council? Proceed carefully with your reading and research of relevant canon law…

We must carefully distance ourselves from the Catechism of the Second Vatican Council and the Canon Law of the Second Vatican Council – until such time that we are sufficiently catechized to recognize, and defend against, modernist ploys.

That being said, Traditional Continuing Catholic Education is a lifelong, prayerful, and parallel three-track process. Most of us tend to focus on the most important track – prayerful catechesis – to the exclusion of the other two tracks: the contemporary operating tempo of our Roman Catholic Church and the contemporary operating tempo of the secular world in which we live.

Why is Traditional Continuing Catholic Education a parallel three-track process? In Fidei Depositum, an Apostolic Constitution on the publication of the modernist Catechism of the Catholic Church, His Holiness Pope John Paul II wrote:

“A catechism should faithfully and systematically present the teaching of Sacred Scripture, the living Tradition in the Church and the authentic Magisterium, as well as the spiritual heritage of the Fathers, Doctors and saints of the Church, to allow for a better knowledge of the Christian mystery and for enlivening the faith of the People of God. It should take into account the doctrinal statements which down the centuries the Holy Spirit has intimated to his Church. It should also help to illumine with the light of faith the new situations and problems which had not yet emerged in the past (emphasis supplied).”

 

We will borrow from the modernists and predicate our second and third tracks on the last sentence of the preceding Fidei Depositum quote: “It should also help to illumine with the light of faith the new [ecclesial and secular] situations and problems which had not yet emerged in the past.”

Fidei Depositum also mitigates the need for a separate track dedicated to the study of Sacred Scripture: “A catechism should faithfully and systematically present the teaching of Sacred Scripture….”

That being said, it should also be emphasized that prayer is not, of itself, a fourth track – it is an essential and integral part of the three-track process. Prayer, by definition, is essentially the voluntary response to the awareness of God’s presence. This response may be an acknowledgement of God’s greatness and of a person’s total dependence on him (adoration), or gratitude for his benefits to oneself and others (thanksgiving), or sorrow for sins committed and begging for mercy (expiation), or asking for graces needed (petition), or affection for God, who is all good (love).

Without prayer there can be no meaningful catechesis, no meaningful understanding of the contemporary operating tempo of our Roman Catholic Church, and no meaningful understanding of the contemporary operating tempo of the secular world in which we live.

Prayerful catechesis is clearly the critical track in the three-track Traditional Continuing Catholic Education process. Catechesis, by definition, is that form of ecclesiastical action that leads both communities and individual members of the faithful to maturity of faith. Because of the varied circumstances and multiple needs, catechetical activity takes on various forms.

That being said, recall that the movement away from catechism-based education is one reason that the flame of righteousness that once roared from our pulpits has been reduced to a flicker – and why we have so many marginally catechized Catholics.

Recall that the traditional four-volume Baltimore Catechism was the de facto standard Catholic school text in the United States from 1885 to the late 1960s – and it is still in print. More importantly, it is a particularly interesting choice for today’s tech savvy students because it is now available as a free eBook (Amazon.com, Project Guttenberg, etc.) that can be read on most popular eBook readers (Kindle, Nook, etc.), personal computers, I-Pads, Smartphones, etc. An inexpensive ($2.99) Baltimore Catechism Flash Cards (Illustrated) is also available in eBook format. The eBooks and flash cards can also be projected on a large screen for everyone to read and discuss.

Baltimore Catechism No. 1: The 33 lessons contained in this volume present the basics of the Catholic faith in a manner suitable for first communicants through fifth graders.

Baltimore Catechism No. 2: The 37 lessons contained in this volume present the fundamentals of the Catholic Faith in a manner suitable for sixth through ninth graders and those preparing for Confirmation.

Baltimore Catechism No. 3: The lessons contained in this volume are intended for students who have received their Confirmation and/or high schoolers. It includes additional questions, definitions, examples, and applications that build upon the content of the original Baltimore Catechism (No. 2).

Baltimore Catechism No. 4: This volume is an Explanation of the Baltimore Catechism can be used as a reference work, or as a teacher’s manual for the original Baltimore Catechisms. It is often used as an advanced textbook. Its explanations of many little known questions pertaining to the Catholic Faith are designed to reward the questioning reader.

The Preface (Baltimore Catechism No. 4) explains the book may also be used as a textbook or catechism for more advanced classes; that the complete list of numbered questions on the explanations (at the end of the book) makes it very useful for that purpose.

Recall that the traditional Baltimore Catechism remained in use in nearly all Catholic schools until the 1960’s (post Second Vatican Council) when many schools and diocese quietly started moving away from catechism-based education.

Consideration should therefore be given to reintroducing the traditional four volume Baltimore Catechism as the catechism of choice for Traditional

 

Continuing Catholic Education. That being said, on November 16, 2015, His Eminence Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke reminisced:

“I remember when I was going to elementary school, we had the Baltimore Catechism and we were taught about marriage from the first years of school. Then as we got older, we got the second and third edition and it got more substantial, but it was always the same in building and growing.”

It will be a daunting challenge to reintroduce traditional catechesis. Introducing Traditional Continuing Catholic Education will be an even more daunting challenge. Recall that the USCCB’s Ad Hoc Committee to Oversee the Use of the Catechism has effectively entrenched the movement away from catechism- based education. Moving on…

Traditional Continuing Catholic Education will require competent traditional church authority to develop and implement a unique objective oriented Catechism course of instruction. For example:

  •   Basic Course: The basic course presumes the student has received the Sacrament of the Apostolate (i.e., the sacrament of Confirmation). The objective of the basic course is to reestablish a foundation for further catechesis – by reaffirming traditional Catholic doctrine associated with preparation for the sacraments of Penance, Holy Communion, and Confirmation.The Baltimore Catechism Four is the text of choice because of its explanations of many little known questions pertaining to the Catholic Faith. Also recall that the Preface (Baltimore Catechism Four) explains the book may also be used as a textbook or catechism for more advanced classes; that the complete list of numbered questions on the explanations (at the end of the book) makes it very useful for that purpose.

    Competent traditional church authority will have to develop a syllabus (i.e., program, curriculum, course outline, program of study) for this basic course.

  •   Intermediate Course: The objective of the intermediate course is to reestablish a foundation for further catechesis – by reaffirming traditional Catholic doctrine associated with the essentials of our traditional Catholic faith: Salvation History, the Apostles’ Creed, the Commandments, the Beatitudes, the Seven Sacraments, and the Lord’s Prayer. 

The Baltimore Catechism Four is again the text of choice. Again recall that the Preface (Baltimore Catechism Four) explains the book may also be used as a textbook or catechism for more advanced classes; that the complete list of numbered questions on the explanations (at the end of the book) makes it very useful for that purpose.

Competent traditional church authority will also have to develop a syllabus for this intermediate course.

  •   Advanced Course: The objective of the advanced course is to further reestablish a foundation for teaching traditional catechesis and for defending your faith – by focusing on teaching the Catholic faith; what we believe; the channels of grace; Christian morality; and Prayer.The Baltimore Catechism Three is the text of choice because it includes additional questions, definitions, examples, and applications that build upon the content of the original Baltimore Catechism Four.

    Competent traditional church authority will also have to develop a syllabus for this advanced course.

  •   Basic Apologetics Course: The objective of the basic apologetics course is to learn how to research doctrinal issues using both reference books and the internet.Recommended reference books include, but are not limited to, Denzinger’s The Sources of Catholic Dogma, The 1917 Pio- Benedictine Code of Canon Law, the Douay-Rheims bible translation, A Textual Concordance of the Holy Scriptures, and Father John Hardon’s Modern Catholic Dictionary. Secondary reference books include, but are not limited to The 1983 Johanno-Pauline Code of Canon Law and the 1994 Catechism of the Catholic Church. The secondary references, albeit tainted by the Second Vatican Council, include footnotes that will often assist us in researching relevant issues.

    Competent traditional church authority will also have to develop a syllabus for this course.

  •   Advanced Apologetics Course: The objective of the advanced apologetics course is to identify and understand contrarian modernist doctrine – so that we can defend against it. 

Recommended reading includes, but is not limited to:

o Quo Primum – Apostolic Constitution promulgating the 1570 edition of the Roman Missal, issued by Pope Saint Pius V on July 14, 1570.

o Sanctissimnus Dominus – Decree of the Holy Office, Condemning Sixty-five Propositions Which Favored Laxism in Moral Theology; issued by Pope Innocent XI on March 4, 1679. [For details see Denzinger, The Sources of Catholic Dogma, DS 1151-1215]

o Lamentabili Sane – Pope Pius X Syllabus Condemning the Errors of the Modernists, issued July 3, 1907

o Pascendi Dominici Gregis – Encyclical, On the Doctrine of the Modernists, issued by Pope Pius X on September 8, 1907.

o Sacrorum antistitum – Comprehensive Oath Against Modernism, promulgated by Pope Pius X on September 1, 1910.

o Sacrfosanctum Concilium – Second Vatican Council’s Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, promulgated by Pope Paul VI on December 4, 1963.

o Sacram Liturgiam – Pope Paul VI Apostolic Letter, decreed certain prescriptions of the Second Vatican Council’s Constitution on the Liturgy (Sacrfosanctum Concilium), issued Motu Proprio on January 25, 1964.

o Inter Oecumenici – Instructions On Implementing the Constitution of the Sacred Liturgy, given by the Sacred Congregation of Rites on September 26, 1964 and to be faithfully observed by all concerned effective March 7, 1965.

o Profession of the Faith – Profession of Faith, promulgated by Pope Paul VI on July 17, 1967. [replaced Pope Saint Pius X’s comprehensive September 1, 1910, Oath Against Modernism]

o Providentissima Mater Ecclesia –Apostolic Constitution, Promulgation of Pope Pius X’s Codification of Canon Law, promulgated by Pope Benedict XV on May 25, 1917. [Code of canon law is also known as 1917 Pio-Benedictine Code of Canon Law.]

 

o Facile Conicere – Allocution, Reference “Yet, as Pope Paul VI declared, these revisions are not to contradict the Roman Rite, since “what is Roman is the foundation of our Catholicity,” Referenced by Hardon, Modern Catholic Dictionary, definition of Roman Rite, page 472], given by Pope Paul VI on October 14, 1968.

o Missale Romanum, Apostolic Constitution on New Roman Missal issued by his Holiness Pope Paul VI on April 3, 1969.

o The Ottavani Intervention (hyperlinked to EWTN) Letter from Cardinal Ottavani to Pope Paul VI, Critical Study of the New Order of Mass, September 5, 1969.

o Ministeria Quaedam –Pope Paul VI Apostolic Letter, On First Tonsure, Minor Orders, and the Subdiaconate, given Motu Proprio on August 15, 1972, and effective January 1, 1973.

o Sacrae Disciplinae Leges, Apostolic Constitution, For the Promulgation of the New Code of Canon Law, published by Pope John Paul II on January 25, 1983. [New code of canon law is also known as The 1983 Johanno-Pauline Code of Canon Law.]

o Fidei Depositum – Apostolic Constitution, On the Publication of the Catechism of the Catholic Church Prepared Following the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council, published by Pope John Paul II on October 11, 1992. [New catechism is also known as the 1994 Catechism of the Catholic Church.]

o Universi Dominici Gregis – Apostolic Constitution, On the Vacancy of the Apostolic See and the Election of the Roman Pontiff, given by Pope John Paul II on February 22, 1996.

Competent traditional church authority will also have to develop a syllabus for this advanced course.

Adults – especially parents – are in particular need of Traditional Continuing Catholic Education. Why? Family catechesis precedes, accompanies, and enriches other forms of instruction in the faith. Parents have the mission of teaching their children to pray and to discover their vocation as children of God.

 

Does the fact that we are baptized Roman Catholics, go to confession once a year, and go to mass on Sunday qualify us to catechize our children? Probably not any more than sitting in the church pew qualifies us to preach, say mass, and hear confession.

That being said, who catechized us? Are we candidates for adult catechesis? More importantly, what are the qualifications of those teaching Catholic Catechism to our children and grandchildren? What are the qualifications of those teaching Catholic Catechism at our Catholic colleges and universities, Catholic high schools, and Catholic parochial schools?

Our catechist had the best of intentions. Our children’s and grandchildren’s catechist had the best of intentions. The issue is their qualifications. There are good parishes with trained catechists – but there are also many modernist parishes with well-intentioned minimally trained volunteer modernist catechists.

It all goes back to the education and training of our catechists. If it is to be, it is up to you…

There is also more to Traditional Continuing Catholic Education than just prayerful catechesis. Two other tracks parallel catechesis. The second track focuses on the contemporary operating tempo of our Roman Catholic Church. The third track focuses on the contemporary operating tempo of the secular world in which we live.

Why is it important that we study the contemporary operating tempo of our Roman Catholic Church and the secular world in which we live? Because in paragraph two of Fidei Depositum we were charged with illumining with the light of faith the new [ecclesial and secular] situations and problems which had not yet emerged in the past. Because the underlying issue is the church militant – struggling with sin and temptation. Because the underlying issue is moral decadence and spiritual warfare. We cannot establish a defensive perimeter, or engage our enemy, without knowing who or what threatens our Roman Catholic faith. Before proceeding down these two tracks, it should be understood that our purpose is not to find ways to criticize individuals but to illuminate weaknesses that can be addressed and improved.

Before proceeding down the second and third tracks we must also understand and accept that we will probably encounter situations that challenge our respect and loyalty to both ecclesiastic and secular offices and, more often than not, to the incumbents.

 

We must therefore understand the fundamental difference between an ecclesiastical office (E.g., Pope, Cardinal, Archbishop, Bishop, Priest, Deacon, etc.) and its incumbent. We must also understand the fundamental difference between a secular office (E.g., President, Vice President, Senator, Representative, Governor, Mayor, Councilman, etc.) and its incumbent.

All of us, without exception, should always show the utmost respect and loyalty to the office – be it ecclesiastical or secular. With this in mind we must not forget that the incumbent is a human being whose human actions, by virtue of free will, are morally imputable. There is therefore a rebuttable presumption that the actions of the incumbent – a human being – are morally good and acceptable. Until proven otherwise, we all owe the incumbent, without exception, the same respect and loyalty accorded his office.

Absent morally good and acceptable human action, we must still respect and remain loyal to the incumbent’s office – while working charitably to show the incumbent the error of their way. Recall:

“But if thy brother shall offend against thee, go and rebuke him between thee and him alone. If he shall hear thee, thou shalt gain thy brother. And if he will not hear thee: take with thee one or two more, that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may stand. And if he will not hear them: tell the church. And if he will not hear the church: let him be to thee as the heathen and publican. Amen I say to you, whatsoever you shall bind upon earth shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever you shall loose upon earth shall be loosed also in heaven.” [Douay-Rheims translation, Matthew 18: 15-18]

In scripture it is also written:

“I say to you that even so there shall be joy in heaven upon one sinner that doth penance, more than upon ninety-nine just who need not penance.” [Douay-Rheims translation, Luke 15:7]

Our purpose is not to criticize. Our purpose is not to beat the drums of doom and gloom. Our purpose is to illuminate and understand the scope of the problem and become a part of the solution. Our purpose is to charitably bring one or more persons back into the fold…

“The fruits of charity are joy, peace, and mercy; charity demands beneficence and fraternal correction; it is benevolence; it fosters reciprocity and remains disinterested and generous; it is friendship and communion….” [1994 CCC, paragraph 1829]

With this in mind, we need to develop the two other Continuing Catholic Education tracks. Both require reading contemporary books and articles in an effort to understand the contemporary operating tempo – the good, the bad, and the ugly – of the Roman Catholic Church and the secular world. Our emphasis should be on contemporary and discerning what is good or bad. It is time we investigate history and learn what is really at stake at this moment in time.

Recall that the second track of continuing Catholic education focuses on the contemporary operating tempo of our Roman Catholic Church. Where will we learn about the contemporary operating tempo of our Roman Catholic Church? By making time to read often controversial books like:

  •   The Decline and Fall of the Catholic Church in America by David Carlin. Reviewer Russell Shaw wrote: “If you are looking for a cheerful, upbeat account of the present state and future prospects of American Catholicism, avoid David Carlin’s The Decline and Fall of the Catholic Church in America like the plague. But if you want a deadly serious examination of a desperate situation, this is essential reading.”
  •   The Courage To Be Catholic: Crisis, Reform, and the Future of the Church by George Weigel. Reviewer James Likoudis wrote: “Readers will find his analysis of the deep-seated causes of the crisis— whose ramifications have affected all sectors of Catholic life—comprehensive and compelling. “At the bottom of the bottom line,” he [Weigel] observes, “every crisis in the Church is a crisis of fidelity.” Starkly put, it has been infidelity to Church teaching on the part of bishops, priests, religious, and laity that has led to the current crisis of clergy sexual abuse, fueled by an alarming “culture of dissent” that has developed in the Church since the revolt against Humanae Vitae in 1968.”
  •   Goodbye, Good Men: How Liberals Brought Corruption Into the Catholic Church by Michael S. Rose. Reviewer Rev. Robert J. Johansen, M.A., wrote:
  • “Rose [Catholic sociologist and author] describes an environment in many Catholic seminaries during the 70’s and 80’s which encouraged dissent and disobedience, as well as moral and doctrinal laxity. In these seminaries, Rose writes, those responsible for recruitment and admissions actively sought out men who supported the “progressive” or liberal Catholic agenda: abolition of priestly celibacy, ordination of women, acceptance of the gay lifestyle, and liturgical experimentation. Those few men with more traditional views who got intothese seminaries were subjected to harassment and attempts at re- indoctrination. Rose describes an atmosphere in which expressions of reverence such as genuflection or kneeling were derided, and traditional devotions such as the rosary received scorn and hostility.”

 Priest: Portraits of Ten Good Men Serving the Church Today by Michael S. Rose. The author is fair and balanced. In Goodbye, Good Men the author focused on the dark side. In this book the author focuses on the bright side. Enough said.

There is a vast difference between being a baptized Catholic and a faithful to the magisterium Catholic.

The third track of continuing Catholic education focuses on the contemporary operating tempo of the secular world in which we live. Again recall that our purpose is to investigate history and learn what is really at stake at this moment in time.

Where will we learn about the contemporary operating tempo of the secular world in which we live? By making time to read contemporary and often controversial books like:

  •   Rules for Radicals: A Pragmatic Primer for Realistic Radicals by Saul D. Alinsky. The author starts by recognizing Lucifer as the very first radical and then tells us that he wrote the book for the Have-Nots – so that they may take it away from those that have. On the outside back cover the book’s publisher does not hesitate to link author Alinsky with both Barrack Obama and Hillary Clinton. In this book the word Catholic appears 11 times, the word priest appears 8 times, the word bishop appears 6 times, the word cardinal appears once, and the word Lucifer appears once. Some of the context seems innocuous. Some of the context, however, is quite poignant and very relevant to the contemporary Catholic Church in the United States of America.
  •   Revellie for Radicals by Saul D. Alinsky. This is the prequel to Rules for Radicals – where Alinsky introduces us to “Big Butch.” In this book the word Catholic appears 37 times, the word priest appears 26 times, and the word bishop appears 2 times. Some of the context is quite poignant and very relevant to the contemporary Catholic Church in the United States of America.
  •   The Shadow Party: How George Soros, Hillary Clinton, and Sixties Radicals Seized Control of the Democratic Party by David Horowitz and Richard Poe. The book makes it clear that Hillary Clinton’s radicalism is deep-rooted and fundamental, bearing the clear imprint of her early mentor Saul Alinsky [page 56]. The book tells us that:

o Hillary met Alinsky through a leftwing church group to which she belonged in high school and they stayed in close touch until Alinsky’s death [page 56].

o Hillary’s 1969 senior thesis at Wellesley College was a 75-page salute to Alinsky. It contained excerpts of his forthcoming book, Rules for Radicals, which he had allowed Hillary to read before the book’s publication in 1971 [page 56].

o Upon graduation from Wellesley College, Alinsky offered Hillary a full-time organizer job with his Industrial Areas Foundation. Hillary declined only because Yale Law School seemed to offer a superior path for infiltrating the Establishment [page 56].

o Hillary’s efforts to cultivate a “moderate” or “centrist” public image faithfully reflect Alinsky’s teaching [page 56].

 The Manchurian President: Barack Obama’s Ties to Communists, Socialists and Other Anti-American Extremists by Aaron Klein (with Brenda J. Elliott). The authors expose just how dangerous Barack Obama really is as America’s president and commander in chief.

There is a vast difference between being a baptized Catholic, a doctrinally correct Catholic, and a well-informed traditional Catholic.

Given the number of books on these two lists, you are probably wondering where to start. Simple. Finish the book you are reading and then alternate the lists. Start at the top of each list and work your way to the bottom of the list. Do not worry – you will find other contemporary books to read as you work your way through the lists. Traditional Continuing Catholic Education is an ongoing – lifelong – prayerful process.

This lifelong, prayerful, and parallel three-track process – Traditional Continuing Catholic Education – will qualify us to catechize our children, family, and friends. We will also be better prepared to struggle with moral decadence, sin, and temptation. We will also be better prepared to engage Lucifer in spiritual warfare. We will better understand when and where to establish a defensive perimeter and when or where to engage our spiritual enemy.

 

By now you are probably pulling your hair out and saying nonsense – the hell with this – I do not have time to do all of this. You cannot seem to find an hour a day in your very busy schedule.

Not a problem. You are blessed with free will. You make time to do those things that are important to you. The Lord will assess your priorities – both earthly and spiritual – when you knock on the pearly gates…

About abyssum

I am a retired Roman Catholic Bishop, Bishop Emeritus of Corpus Christi, Texas
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