THE MILLMAN REPORT FOR 2017 REVEALS THE FANTASTIC GROWTH IN THE MEDICAL INDUSTRY’S TRANSPLANTATION OF HUMAN ORGANS, SOMETHING THAT IS GOOD FROM A HUMANITARIAN ASPECT BUT BAD FROM THE ASPECT OF REMOVING ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION FROM LIVING PERSONS THROUGH THE USE OF SO-CALLED BRAIN DEATH TO PROTECT THE MEDICAL INDUSTRY FROM LIABILITY

 

 

Every three years the Millman Corporation prepares a report on the human organ transplantation industry in the United States.  The most recent report was issued by the Millman Corporation in August of last year, 2017.

Milliman is among the world’s largest providers of actuarial and related products and services. Founded in 1947, Milliman is an independent firm with offices in major cities around the globe. It is owned and managed by its principals—senior consultants whose selection is based on their technical, professional and business achievements.

Milliman serves the full spectrum of business, financial, government, union, education, and nonprofit organizations. In addition to its consulting actuaries, Milliman’s body of professionals includes numerous other specialists, ranging from clinicians to economists.

Despite impressive growth over the past seven decades, Millman still operates according to the guiding principles of its founders, Wendell Milliman and Stuart Robertson. It retains their rigorous standards of professional excellence, peer review and objectivity. It remains committed to developing innovative tools and products and providing expert solutions.

This 2017 report represents Milliman’s triennial summary of estimated U.S. average costs per member per month (PMPM), billed charges, and utilization related to the 30 days prior and 180 days after transplant admission for treatment for organ and tissue transplants. For charges pre- and post-transplant admission, it includes all medical costs associated with the transplant patient.

Organ transplants include single-organ transplants such as heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, and a number of multiple-organ transplants. Tissue transplants include bone marrow and cornea transplants. Millman splits the bone marrow estimates by donor method: autologous, where the donor is the recipient, and allogeneic, where the
donor may be related or unrelated to the recipient.

Highlights of this report include:
· Section II: The 2017 PMPM costs based on billed charges are estimated to be $8.21 and $12.23 for the under-age-65 and ages-65-and-over populations, respectively. These PMPM costs reflect average annual increases of 3.5% and 7.7% from the 2014 report.

The trend for the under-age-65 population consists of a 0.5% composite utilization trend and a 3.0% composite billed charge trend. However, there is a wide range of annual utilization and charge trends by type of transplant for the under-age-65 population, with utilization trends from -11.2% to 17.2% and charge trends from -9.5% to 11.2%. The higher trend for the ages-65-and-over population is mainly due to the difference in the mix of
transplants between the under-age-65 and ages-65-and-over populations.
While billed charges increased about 3.0% per year, many recipients or health plans do not pay billed charges because of negotiated discounts from transplant provider networks.
Hospital length of stay has been fairly stable for most transplants since the 2014 report. Millman’s databases show a length of stay increase for heart transplants and decrease for intestine transplants.

Section IV: Waiting times for kidney transplants and intestine transplants have decreased
dramatically since the 2014 report. However, waiting times for organs such as heart and pancreas have increased since the 2014 report.
Survival rates generally increased slightly from those in the 2014 report, except for pancreas.

All of this is good news for humanitarians; who would not rejoice at so many people getting a new lease on life by having a diseased organ replaced by a good one.

There is only one problem.  How can you justify extending the life of one person at the expense of shortening the life of another person.

The ‘heart’ of the problem is that you cannot transplant the heart (or any other organ) of one person unless that person’s heart is still beating unless you use the fiction of ‘brain death’ and remove the organ while the donor is still really alive.

See this link for a LEXICON OF DEATH https://wp.me/px5Zw-6lR

The Millman Report unfortunately reveals another motive besides altruism for transplanting an organ from a living donor to another person resulting in the death of the donor:  money, profit, wealth.

The practice of medicine was once exclusively a profession in the days of the Hippocratic Oath.

Today it is too often a business, a big business.

The Millman Report of 2017 discloses that the amount of money billed for all of the organ transplants for the covered year was $34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

$34,729,776,300.00.

That kind of medicine is not a profession, IT IS BIG BUSINESS !!!

+Rene Henry Gracida

 

About abyssum

I am a retired Roman Catholic Bishop, Bishop Emeritus of Corpus Christi, Texas
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One Response to THE MILLMAN REPORT FOR 2017 REVEALS THE FANTASTIC GROWTH IN THE MEDICAL INDUSTRY’S TRANSPLANTATION OF HUMAN ORGANS, SOMETHING THAT IS GOOD FROM A HUMANITARIAN ASPECT BUT BAD FROM THE ASPECT OF REMOVING ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION FROM LIVING PERSONS THROUGH THE USE OF SO-CALLED BRAIN DEATH TO PROTECT THE MEDICAL INDUSTRY FROM LIABILITY

  1. Mary Anne says:

    Yes. Then there is the question of whether the truly living donor gets anesthesia. I’ve heard that they don’t but it’s not something you can research easily. It’s terrible.

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